Bill Gates Lends Support to Finding a Cure for Alzheimer’s

 

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

An experienced talent recruiter for companies in the technology sector, Scott Robarge previously worked for SlideRocket and Greylock Partners and, since 2010, has presided over the recruiting firm Another8. Beyond his recruiting endeavors, Scott Robarge is a regular supporter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Alzheimer’s is a cognitive disease that affects more than 5 million Americans and accounted for health care costs of $259 billion in 2017 alone. By 2050, health care costs toward the disease are projected to rise to more than $1 trillion, but the cause to find a cure recently received support from a powerful ally in Bill Gates. The Microsoft cofounder wrote a blog post in November titled “Why I’m Digging Deeper into Alzheimer’s,” in which he notes the importance of finding a cure as people are living longer and, as such, at greater risk to developing the disease.

Most importantly, Gates announced a pair of donations totaling $100 million to support organizations in their efforts to eradicate Alzheimer’s. He is investing $50 million of his personal money in the Dementia Discovery Fund as well as another $50 million in early-phase companies working on “less mainstream” approaches to fighting Alzheimer’s. The billionaire added he is optimistic that a cure can be found, even if it might take more than a decade.

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Antibodies New Wave of Alzheimer’s Research

Alzheimer's Research pic

Alzheimer’s Research
Image: sciencedaily.com

A seasoned recruiter and entrepreneur, Scott Robarge is the founder of Another8, a recruiting firm that primarily acquires talent for fast-paced technology companies. When he isn’t serving as a recruiter, Scott Robarge supports organizations that help lead the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.

Recent research efforts into the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are focused on fighting the plaques that develop in the brain. Researchers believe that by understanding how to better manage these plaques, they may be able to delay its onset.

These plaques, which are a common sign of the condition, are tiny batches of beta-amyloid protein that deposit themselves in the brain and are responsible for brain cell degradation. Some antibodies, such as Aducanumab, have shown the propensity to reduce the amount of plaques that develop in Alzheimer’s patients, effectively slowing the rate of cognitive decline. It is thought that future research efforts in the battle against Alzheimer’s could include other combinations of medications in conjunction with these sorts of antibodies.