Alzheimer’s Association Publishes Risk Guidelines

 

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

As founder of the recruiting firm Another8, Scott Robarge helps early to mid-stage high-tech companies to find skilled talent. Scott Robarge also stands out as an active supporter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

According to a recently published study in Alzheimer’s and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, a person’s lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease depends largely on age, gender, and the presents of dementia symptoms. The researchers have developed a rubric that is unique in its incorporation of changes that occur in the brain as many as 20 years before clinical symptoms appear.

Many people whose brains undergo these changes never develop clinical Alzheimer’s disease, largely because of the prolonged period of pre-clinical asymptomatic presentation. Study author Ron Brookmeyer, PhD, offered the example of a 90-year-old female and 65-year-old female, both with the biomarker of amyloid plaques. Because the 90-year-old has a shorter life expectancy by the time she has reached the age of 90, she would have a lifetime risk that is nearly 21 percent less than that of the 65-year-old.

To evaluate risk, the team’s metric requires information about the patient’s age and whether or not any amyloid deposits are present. The screening also requires assessment of a patient’s level of neuro-degeneration and whether any mild cognitive impairment is present. The presence of all three factors indicates the highest risk.

The chief science officer of the Alzheimer’s Association Dr. Maria Carillo states that risk predictors may prove useful once viable treatments are available. Such risk evaluations also may help to secure volunteers for clinical trials, as a patient may be more likely to volunteer if he or she has a higher risk of developing the disease.

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Alzheimer’s Association BOLD Infrastructure Act

BOLD Infrastructure Act pic

BOLD Infrastructure Act
Image: alzimpact.org

Scott Robarge, a recruiting consultant for Bay Area tech companies and the founder of consultancy Another8, supports the Alzheimer’s Association. Thanks to the support of people like Scott Robarge, the Association combats all forms of Alzheimer’s through fundraising, research, and advocacy.

The Alzheimer’s Association and Alzheimer’s Impact Movement have helped to develop the Building Our Largest Dementia (BOLD) Infrastructure for Alzheimer’s Act, a bill which would enhance the quality of medical care for Alzheimer’s patients nationwide. By improving early detection and diagnosis as well as reducing risk and preventing hospitalizations.

The Act would establish Alzheimer’s Centers of Excellence to provide education for healthcare professionals and other stakeholders about brain health. These centers would also expand existing public-private partnerships active in the field of cognitive impairment, provide assistance to public health departments in dealing with Alzheimer’s, and support caregivers. Public health departments would also receive funding specifically targeted at degenerative brain diseases.

Alzheimer’s Association Holds Awareness Month Each June

 

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Since 2010, Scott Robarge has served as the principal recruiter with Another8, a recruiting company that connects high-growth companies with skilled professionals. Alongside his activities as a recruitment specialist, Scott Robarge supports the Alzheimer’s Association.

In its efforts to direct awareness and funds toward Alzheimer’s research, prevention, and care, the Alzheimer’s Association oversees a variety of programs and events throughout the year. Each June, the organization hosts Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month, which invites people around the globe to raise awareness of the world’s more than 47 million people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Those who want to support Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month can take action by wearing purple and sharing their Alzheimer’s story on social media using the hashtags #MyAlzStory and #EndAlz. The Alzheimer’s Association is also partnering with Lyft and eBay throughout June to raise money for Alzheimer’s care, support, and research.

Held in conjunction with Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month, The Longest Day offers another way for supporters to fight Alzheimer’s disease. Each year on the summer solstice (June 21), individuals and teams worldwide raise funds for Alzheimer’s Association by participating in an activity that they and their families enjoy. More information about The Longest Day and Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month can be found at www.alz.org.

Alzheimer’s Association Sponsors Advocacy Forum in Washington, DC

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Recruiting for technology companies primarily in the San Francisco Bay area, Scott Robarge works as principal and recruiter for Another8. In his personal time, Scott Robarge supports the Alzheimer’s Association.

As the leading voluntary health organization that addresses Alzheimer’s care, research, and support, the Alzheimer’s Association began in 1980 when Jerome H. Stone sought to create an organization that complemented federal efforts surrounding the disease. Since 2010, the organization has been named the top large nonprofit to work for by The Nonprofit Times.

Each year, the Alzheimer’s Association sponsors an advocacy forum where more than 1,000 advocates gather in Washington, DC, to promote research, care, and support services for families dealing with this disease. Thanks to an increase in advocacy efforts in recent years, the organization has helped spur federal research funding of almost $1 billion annually. This is almost half of the $2 billion annual goal by 2025 set by the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. The plan states that $2 billion annually would be needed to prevent or treat the disease. The 2017 forum is scheduled in May at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park.

Alzheimer’s Association Funds Gender-Based Research Efforts

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Scott Robarge is an experienced recruitment professional with more than a decade of experience in the industry. In 2010, he founded Another8, a recruiting firm that specializes in partnering with early to mid-stage technology companies. Outside of his professional pursuits, Scott Robarge focuses his philanthropic efforts toward supporting the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Alzheimer’s Association recently announced $2.2 million in funding for its Sex and Gender in Alzheimer’s (SAGA) initiative that will be distributed to nine studies aimed at understanding why women are disproportionately affected by Alzheimer’s disease.

There are approximately 5 million Americans that suffer from Alzheimer’s, with more than two-thirds of that number being women. According to recent data gathered by the Alzheimer’s Association, in adults over the age of 71, there is a 16 percent rate of the disease, but only an 11 percent rate among men.

While there are some working theories as to why women suffer more than men from Alzheimer’s, researchers still have no definitive answers. The Alzheimer’s Association hopes that, through funding research projects, more knowledge about the gender disparity will be gained.

Alzheimer’s Association Partners with Philanthropist in Fundraiser

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

In 2010, Scott Robarge founded Another8, a recruiting consultancy that helps meet the talent-acquisition goals of early- to mid-stage technology companies. Outside of his professional achievements, Scott Robarge is an active supporter of charitable organizations, and donates to the Alzheimer’s Association, the country’s premier voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.

The Alzhemer’s Association recently announced that it is investing $7 million to support clinical trials that will target brain inflammation as a factor in developing Alzheimer’s disease therapy. The investment was made in partnership with a fundraising initiative called “Part the Cloud Challenge on Neuroinflammation,” led by Michaela “Mikey” Hoag, a philanthropist from Atherton, California. The fundraising drive aims to address a critical gap in the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. After her father died from Alzheimer’s and her mother began showing symptoms, Hoag decided to launch the initiative in order to raise awareness and advance studies in drug development that might otherwise be hampered by lack of funding.

Alzheimer’s Association Uncovers a New Way to Fight Mental Decline

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Recruiter Scott Robarge possesses decades of experience finding and attracting top talent within the technology sector. He founded Another8 in 2010, and continues to lead the growing talent acquisition firm. Alongside his professional endeavors, Scott Robarge supports the efforts of community and health organizations including the Alzheimer’s Association.

New research presented at the recent Alzheimer’s Association International Conference suggests an unconventional way to improve mental resilience and stave off Alzheimer’s. Scientists have found that individuals who do complex work with the public as part of their job are less likely to experience cognitive decline as they age.

Some people experience white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), which are diseased white spots that show up on brain scans. These contribute to mental decline, and are commonly found in people with Alzheimer’s and similar conditions. However, some people develop WMHs, but never manifest symptoms of mental decline. According to researchers, these people are disproportionately likely to work in mentoring, counseling, or similar fields where complex social engagement is key. Diet seems to be a compounding variable, and more research is needed to make use of this interesting development.