Alzheimer’s Association Sponsors Advocacy Forum in Washington, DC

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Recruiting for technology companies primarily in the San Francisco Bay area, Scott Robarge works as principal and recruiter for Another8. In his personal time, Scott Robarge supports the Alzheimer’s Association.

As the leading voluntary health organization that addresses Alzheimer’s care, research, and support, the Alzheimer’s Association began in 1980 when Jerome H. Stone sought to create an organization that complemented federal efforts surrounding the disease. Since 2010, the organization has been named the top large nonprofit to work for by The Nonprofit Times.

Each year, the Alzheimer’s Association sponsors an advocacy forum where more than 1,000 advocates gather in Washington, DC, to promote research, care, and support services for families dealing with this disease. Thanks to an increase in advocacy efforts in recent years, the organization has helped spur federal research funding of almost $1 billion annually. This is almost half of the $2 billion annual goal by 2025 set by the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. The plan states that $2 billion annually would be needed to prevent or treat the disease. The 2017 forum is scheduled in May at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park.

Alzheimer’s Association Funds Gender-Based Research Efforts

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Scott Robarge is an experienced recruitment professional with more than a decade of experience in the industry. In 2010, he founded Another8, a recruiting firm that specializes in partnering with early to mid-stage technology companies. Outside of his professional pursuits, Scott Robarge focuses his philanthropic efforts toward supporting the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Alzheimer’s Association recently announced $2.2 million in funding for its Sex and Gender in Alzheimer’s (SAGA) initiative that will be distributed to nine studies aimed at understanding why women are disproportionately affected by Alzheimer’s disease.

There are approximately 5 million Americans that suffer from Alzheimer’s, with more than two-thirds of that number being women. According to recent data gathered by the Alzheimer’s Association, in adults over the age of 71, there is a 16 percent rate of the disease, but only an 11 percent rate among men.

While there are some working theories as to why women suffer more than men from Alzheimer’s, researchers still have no definitive answers. The Alzheimer’s Association hopes that, through funding research projects, more knowledge about the gender disparity will be gained.

Alzheimer’s Association Partners with Philanthropist in Fundraiser

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

In 2010, Scott Robarge founded Another8, a recruiting consultancy that helps meet the talent-acquisition goals of early- to mid-stage technology companies. Outside of his professional achievements, Scott Robarge is an active supporter of charitable organizations, and donates to the Alzheimer’s Association, the country’s premier voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.

The Alzhemer’s Association recently announced that it is investing $7 million to support clinical trials that will target brain inflammation as a factor in developing Alzheimer’s disease therapy. The investment was made in partnership with a fundraising initiative called “Part the Cloud Challenge on Neuroinflammation,” led by Michaela “Mikey” Hoag, a philanthropist from Atherton, California. The fundraising drive aims to address a critical gap in the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. After her father died from Alzheimer’s and her mother began showing symptoms, Hoag decided to launch the initiative in order to raise awareness and advance studies in drug development that might otherwise be hampered by lack of funding.

Alzheimer’s Association Uncovers a New Way to Fight Mental Decline

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Recruiter Scott Robarge possesses decades of experience finding and attracting top talent within the technology sector. He founded Another8 in 2010, and continues to lead the growing talent acquisition firm. Alongside his professional endeavors, Scott Robarge supports the efforts of community and health organizations including the Alzheimer’s Association.

New research presented at the recent Alzheimer’s Association International Conference suggests an unconventional way to improve mental resilience and stave off Alzheimer’s. Scientists have found that individuals who do complex work with the public as part of their job are less likely to experience cognitive decline as they age.

Some people experience white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), which are diseased white spots that show up on brain scans. These contribute to mental decline, and are commonly found in people with Alzheimer’s and similar conditions. However, some people develop WMHs, but never manifest symptoms of mental decline. According to researchers, these people are disproportionately likely to work in mentoring, counseling, or similar fields where complex social engagement is key. Diet seems to be a compounding variable, and more research is needed to make use of this interesting development.

Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

 

Founder of the recruiting firm Another8, Scott Robarge is involved with a number of charitable organizations. Scott Robarge is especially supportive of the Alzheimer’s Association and other groups supporting Alzheimer’s research.

The Alzheimer’s Association hosts a number of events to raise money and awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, including the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Individuals interested in participating in the Walk can visit http://www.alz.org and use the search function to locate a nearby event, simply entering their address or Zip code into the appropriate search bar.

After finding a nearby Walk to End Alzheimer’s, individuals can sign up as group leaders, team members, or as individual participants. Interested walkers should then use the remaining days and weeks to raise money and awareness about their walk and the other ways to support the Alzheimer’s Association. Any person unable to find a nearby event or physically incapable of participating in a walk can make a direct donation at the Association website.

Alzheimer’s Association Builds Supportive Communities in the US

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Scott Robarge, a professional recruiter for fast-paced technology companies throughout the Bay Area, supports the Alzheimer’s Association. As a contributor, Scott Robarge helps the organization in its goals of augmenting support and care of patients living with the disease.

A top voluntary organization, the Alzheimer’s Association seeks to end the illness by furthering research, offering improved care, and encouraging healthy lifestyles. One way that the association does this is through eliminating the loneliness that Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers commonly experience. The organization develops communities through chapters based nationwide, giving local areas the support that they need.

The organization also hosts ALZConnected®, a free online community that is designed to help people who have Alzheimer’s or dementia. This includes family members, caregivers, friends, people who have lost loved ones, and Alzheimer’s patients.

Staff from the Alzheimer’s Association regularly hold educational sessions and support groups across the US. There is even a Community Resource Finder that offers assistance for housing, service, programs, care, and legal matters.

How to Train Your Brain as You Age

Scott Robarge, a supporter of the Alzheimer’s Association, is a recruiting/staffing professional who founded Another8 in 2010. He and his team at Another8 partner with hyper-growth technology firms in the Bay Area and the Boulder/Denver area, to ensure they have the resources necessary to meet their talent needs. Outside of his work at Another8, Scott Robarge is interested in resources for brain training in old age.

Physical decline is expected as the body ages, but many individuals are more concerned with the state of their mind. There are a number of simple steps a person can take to keep the brain sharp. Reading is an obvious tool, but more importantly, individuals should never stop learning. Whether you are a recent college graduate or a new retiree, fill your free time with a hobby that involves new skills to learn and information to be processed. The brain is a machine that should always be in use. Interests that involve multiple senses will engage the brain in different ways and further improve its functions.

At the same time, as we age, we must be wary of our limitations. Minimizing the mental energy expended on mundane tasks is essential to keeping the mind sharp for important moments. Using calendars and planners can help, as can a dedication to simple routines; spending half an hour searching for the TV remote is more mentally tiring than one might think. Keep small, frequently used items in a specific place. Finally, take advantage of the time and freedom old age provides. Repetition is helpful for brain training, but only when properly timed. If an activity is growing boring or frustrating, take a break and move on to something else.