Walk with the Alzheimer’s Association to Raise Money for a Cure

 

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Scott Robarge has led a lucrative career through his talents as a recruiting consultant. The co-founder of Alpine Recruiting and founder of Another8, Scott Robarge spends his time outside of work supporting the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Alzheimer’s Association, founded in 1980, is the leading global nonprofit organization dedicated to the treatment, care, and eventual cure of Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to funding research and treatment for those with the disease, the Alzheimer’s Association hosts a multitude of fundraisers for public participation, as well as support groups for families, a virtual online library for educational assistance, and options for advocacy.

The most popular fundraiser at the Alzheimer’s Association is the “Walk to End Alzheimer’s” event. The walk is held in more than 600 local communities, making it easier for participants to find a local event without the additional burden of traveling expenses. The event itself consists of a two- to three-mile walk or run, depending on the participant, and does not require a registration fee, though all registrants are encouraged to raise a minimum of $100. All funds help to support the different areas of the Alzheimer’s Association.

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Alzheimer’s Association Sponsors Advocacy Forum in Washington, DC

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Recruiting for technology companies primarily in the San Francisco Bay area, Scott Robarge works as principal and recruiter for Another8. In his personal time, Scott Robarge supports the Alzheimer’s Association.

As the leading voluntary health organization that addresses Alzheimer’s care, research, and support, the Alzheimer’s Association began in 1980 when Jerome H. Stone sought to create an organization that complemented federal efforts surrounding the disease. Since 2010, the organization has been named the top large nonprofit to work for by The Nonprofit Times.

Each year, the Alzheimer’s Association sponsors an advocacy forum where more than 1,000 advocates gather in Washington, DC, to promote research, care, and support services for families dealing with this disease. Thanks to an increase in advocacy efforts in recent years, the organization has helped spur federal research funding of almost $1 billion annually. This is almost half of the $2 billion annual goal by 2025 set by the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. The plan states that $2 billion annually would be needed to prevent or treat the disease. The 2017 forum is scheduled in May at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park.

Alzheimer’s Association Partners with Philanthropist in Fundraiser

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

In 2010, Scott Robarge founded Another8, a recruiting consultancy that helps meet the talent-acquisition goals of early- to mid-stage technology companies. Outside of his professional achievements, Scott Robarge is an active supporter of charitable organizations, and donates to the Alzheimer’s Association, the country’s premier voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.

The Alzhemer’s Association recently announced that it is investing $7 million to support clinical trials that will target brain inflammation as a factor in developing Alzheimer’s disease therapy. The investment was made in partnership with a fundraising initiative called “Part the Cloud Challenge on Neuroinflammation,” led by Michaela “Mikey” Hoag, a philanthropist from Atherton, California. The fundraising drive aims to address a critical gap in the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. After her father died from Alzheimer’s and her mother began showing symptoms, Hoag decided to launch the initiative in order to raise awareness and advance studies in drug development that might otherwise be hampered by lack of funding.

Alzheimer’s Association Builds Supportive Communities in the US

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

Scott Robarge, a professional recruiter for fast-paced technology companies throughout the Bay Area, supports the Alzheimer’s Association. As a contributor, Scott Robarge helps the organization in its goals of augmenting support and care of patients living with the disease.

A top voluntary organization, the Alzheimer’s Association seeks to end the illness by furthering research, offering improved care, and encouraging healthy lifestyles. One way that the association does this is through eliminating the loneliness that Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers commonly experience. The organization develops communities through chapters based nationwide, giving local areas the support that they need.

The organization also hosts ALZConnected®, a free online community that is designed to help people who have Alzheimer’s or dementia. This includes family members, caregivers, friends, people who have lost loved ones, and Alzheimer’s patients.

Staff from the Alzheimer’s Association regularly hold educational sessions and support groups across the US. There is even a Community Resource Finder that offers assistance for housing, service, programs, care, and legal matters.

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s – Fundraising to Fight the Disease

A recruiter with more than a decade of experience in the field, Scott Robarge founded Another8, a recruiting firm that specializes in partnering with early- to mid-stage technology companies, in 2010. Outside of work, Scott Robarge is a longtime supporter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

The nation’s leading Alzheimer’s disease advocacy, support, and research organization, the Alzheimer’s Association was established in 1980. With a vision of a world without the disease, the association provides care and support through local chapters, online resources, and a telephone helpline that gives advice and information to more than 250,000 callers every year.

The Alzheimer’s Association’s annual event, the Walk to End Alzheimer’s, is the largest awareness and fundraising event for the disease in the world. Although it has no entry fee, the association receives donations and pledges from the walkers. Nearly 500,000 walkers from more than 600 communities participate in the annual event. During the 2- to 3-mile route, participants wear wristbands with a Promise Garden flower that indicates their relationship to the disease. People with Alzheimer’s receive blue flower wristbands, while yellow flowers are for people who currently support or care for someone with the disease. Participants who have lost a loved one to Alzheimer’s receive purple flower wristbands, and orange flowers are for people who do not fall under the other categories but who support the association’s cause.