New Drug May Slow Mental Decline of Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

 

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

A graduate of the University of Michigan with a bachelor’s in industrial and operations engineering, Scott Robarge has founded and headed recruiting companies including Alpine Recruiting and Another8. Outside of his current role at Another 8, Scott Robarge is a longtime supporter of the Alzheimer’s Association, which recently announced promising results of a new drug that may slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

In a recent drug trial by biotech companies Eisai and Biogen, drug BAN2401 led to a 30 percent drop in mental decline for patients who received the highest dose of the drug. Ultimately, the drug didn’t meet the goals for the trial, but the experimental therapy removed a significant amount of sticky plaque accumulated in participants’ brains.

The results come with a few caveats, specifically related to the method used to measure mental decline. Researchers from the companies used a scale that blended sections of three commonly used tests, but they were the first to use such a measure. Also, the sample size was small, but results offer a bit of hope to families of patients with Alzheimer’s after several decades of failed clinical trials.

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Alzheimer’s Association Ambassador Program Advocates for Policy Change

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

 

Scott Robarge is the founder and principal of Another8, a recruitment firm in California that focuses on connecting professionals with high-growth organizations and venture-backed startups. Beyond his work for the company, Scott Robarge supports the Alzheimer’s Association. The organization unites supporters in becoming effective Alzheimer’s advocates through its Ambassador Program, which is part of a trio of programs designed to empower volunteers to work toward federal and state policy changes.

Members of the program consist of dedicated grassroots volunteers who care for and improve the quality of life of dementia patients and their families by educating and engaging policymakers on critical Alzheimer’s issues. Each volunteer serves as a main point of in-district contact to an assigned Congress member and works on building a trusting relationship with his or her congressional office staff. Volunteers also collaborate with the Alzheimer’s Congressional Team (ACT), another of the Alzheimer’s Association’s political advocacy programs. Individuals interested in becoming Ambassadors must commit to a one-year term and may renew their involvement thereafter.