Alzheimer’s Association Publishes Risk Guidelines

 

Alzheimer’s Association pic

Alzheimer’s Association
Image: alz.org

As founder of the recruiting firm Another8, Scott Robarge helps early to mid-stage high-tech companies to find skilled talent. Scott Robarge also stands out as an active supporter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

According to a recently published study in Alzheimer’s and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, a person’s lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease depends largely on age, gender, and the presents of dementia symptoms. The researchers have developed a rubric that is unique in its incorporation of changes that occur in the brain as many as 20 years before clinical symptoms appear.

Many people whose brains undergo these changes never develop clinical Alzheimer’s disease, largely because of the prolonged period of pre-clinical asymptomatic presentation. Study author Ron Brookmeyer, PhD, offered the example of a 90-year-old female and 65-year-old female, both with the biomarker of amyloid plaques. Because the 90-year-old has a shorter life expectancy by the time she has reached the age of 90, she would have a lifetime risk that is nearly 21 percent less than that of the 65-year-old.

To evaluate risk, the team’s metric requires information about the patient’s age and whether or not any amyloid deposits are present. The screening also requires assessment of a patient’s level of neuro-degeneration and whether any mild cognitive impairment is present. The presence of all three factors indicates the highest risk.

The chief science officer of the Alzheimer’s Association Dr. Maria Carillo states that risk predictors may prove useful once viable treatments are available. Such risk evaluations also may help to secure volunteers for clinical trials, as a patient may be more likely to volunteer if he or she has a higher risk of developing the disease.

Skiing vs. Snowboarding – Which is Best for Beginners?

 

Skiing pic

Skiing
Image: thoughtco.com

Scott Robarge is an experienced senior recruiting professional who has served tenures as a manager and recruiter salesforce.com and part of the talent team with Greylock Partners. He has served as a founding principal with Another8 since 2010. In his free time, Scott Robarge enjoys both skiing and snowboarding.

Newcomers to the slopes are often unsure whether to choose skis or a snowboard. The right decision depends on a number of factors, including how quickly one wants to move through the various stages of skills development.

Conventional wisdom among winter sports enthusiasts holds that skiing is easier to learn but more difficult to master, while snowboarding is more difficult to learn but easier to master. In other words, skiing provides more immediate enjoyment for newcomers during their first day or two on the slopes. This holds true for two main reasons: because skis allow novices to separate their legs, they can throw one foot outward on either side to aid in balance. Further, skiing takes place in a straightforward body position that provides maximum peripheral vision on both sides.

Alternately, although they may initially be hindered by their inability to separate their legs, snowboarders ultimately regard this “hindrance” as an advantage. This is because crossing skis can have disastrous effects that snowboarders need not fear. It may take multiple days to figure out how to ride on the snowboard’s heel and toe edges, but after beginners learn this fundamental technique, they can begin to master difficult tricks relatively quickly.