Greenhouse Software Helps Recruiters Narrow Down Candidates

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Another8
Image: another8.com

With more than two decades of experience working in recruiting, Scott Robarge serves as principal and recruiter for Another8, which he also founded. The San Francisco Bay-area firm focuses on connecting professionals with venture-backed start-ups and other high-growth businesses. To help connect with more individuals, Scott Robarge draws on social and professional networking sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, and Greenhouse.

In late 2013, Greenhouse utilized $2.7 million in funding and opened its recruiting software to other companies to help with recruiting. Since many recruiters use Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to seek potential matches, Greenhouse sought to update and address many of these recruiters’ needs that ATS weren’t meeting. The ATS searches through resumes for specific keywords and narrows down the list of potential candidates. Greenhouse focused its ATS on drawing up hiring plans, conducting structured interviews, and collecting feedback from these interviews.

As a result, Greenhouse clients have changed their hiring processes, making the transition more organized and efficient. The interview kits help managers and interviewers comprehend the entire process without constant training. They walk the recruiters through the entire program, from determining hiring needs to sourcing candidates and helping recruiters to make data-backed decisions.

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Antibodies New Wave of Alzheimer’s Research

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Alzheimer’s Research
Image: sciencedaily.com

A seasoned recruiter and entrepreneur, Scott Robarge is the founder of Another8, a recruiting firm that primarily acquires talent for fast-paced technology companies. When he isn’t serving as a recruiter, Scott Robarge supports organizations that help lead the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.

Recent research efforts into the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are focused on fighting the plaques that develop in the brain. Researchers believe that by understanding how to better manage these plaques, they may be able to delay its onset.

These plaques, which are a common sign of the condition, are tiny batches of beta-amyloid protein that deposit themselves in the brain and are responsible for brain cell degradation. Some antibodies, such as Aducanumab, have shown the propensity to reduce the amount of plaques that develop in Alzheimer’s patients, effectively slowing the rate of cognitive decline. It is thought that future research efforts in the battle against Alzheimer’s could include other combinations of medications in conjunction with these sorts of antibodies.